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4L60E Transmission Rebuild Page 1 of 33

Disclaimer: The information provided here is how I did it. I strongly urge you to do your own research and make sure you do it right. No claim is made that the information provided is the only way it should be done, or that you should follow my work without verifying for yourself that it is correct. You are free to do as you choose with the information shared here, but you do so at your own risk.

 
Figure 1
Figure 1

Figure 1. The 4L60E to Dana 300 Adapter Kit from Novak Conversions was purchased. You can find this part at Novak Conversions. This kit necessitates changing out the output shaft of the transmission, so that being the case, we decided to rebuild the transmission first. The first part of this build is going to be an automatic transmission rebuild. This will be shared so if you wish to do your own, you can benefit from the mistakes that were made and not make them yourself. Now to commence the project!

Removing the bellhousing was first. The bolts holding it on are EXTREMELY tight!. These bolts need a Torx Plus 50 bit to be removed. The bit offered by Sonnax was purchased from Amazon, Sonnax part number 77000-HBK. This bit has an 8mm hex on the opposite end. There was difficulty finding a 3/8 drive 6-point socket to fit it. After breaking two 1/4 drive sockets, and stripping out two of the bolt heads, a Craftsman 8mm hex bit with 3/8 drive was purchased, and the 8mm bit was pressed out and the Sonnax bit pressed in. Even with the 3/8 drive breaker bar, it still took a 3ft cheater bar on it to get the rest of the bolts loose. The stripped ones had to be drilled out. I used the Harbor Freight screw extractor kit seen in the photo to get the rest of them out. It worked surprisingly well for as cheap as it was.

Figure 2
Figure 2

Figure 2. The next step is pump removal. The pan was removed, then the bolts shown here that hold the pump in were removed. The tool designed for removing the pump was too expensive, so a large prybar was used on the back side of the pump in an opening next to the valve body. If you copy what was done here, you do so at your own risk. If not done carefully, the case or pump can be damaged. In this case, the pump is not going to be re-used so the risk involved was acceptable. It came out with no damage, even though it was a little stubborn. Not shown is removal of the valve body.


 
 
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